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Back Paleontology Tyrannosaurus Rex

Tyrannosaurus Rex

Long lost cousin of T. rex identified by scientists

Scientists have identified a new species of gigantic theropod dinosaur, a close relative of T. rex, from fossil skull and jaw bones discovered in China.

According to findings published online on April 1, 2011 in the scientific journal Cretaceous Research, the newly named dinosaur species Zhuchengtyrannus magnus probably measured about 11 metres long, stood about 4 metres tall, and weighed close to 6 tonnes.

Comparable in size and scale to the legendary T. rex, this new dinosaur is one of the largest theropod (carnivorous) dinosaurs ever identified by scientists.

Alongside T. rex and the Asian Tarbosaurus, Zhuchengtyrannus magnus is one of a specialised group of gigantic theropods called tyrannosaurines. The tyrannosaurines...

T. rex more hyena than lion: Tyrannosaurus rex was opportunistic feeder, not top predator, paleontologists say

1000pa (Feb. 22, 2011) — The ferocious Tyrannosaurus rex has been depicted as the top dog of the Cretaceous, ruthlessly stalking herds of duck-billed dinosaurs and claiming the role of apex predator, much as the lion reigns supreme in the African veld.

But a new census of all dinosaur skeletons unearthed over a large area of eastern Montana shows that Tyrannosaurus was too numerous to have subsisted solely on the dinosaurs it tracked and...

1000pa (Feb. 22, 2011) — The ferocious...

Dinosaurs survived mass extinction by 700,000 years, fossil find suggests

1000pa (Jan. 28, 2011) — University of Alberta researchers determined that a fossilized dinosaur bone found in New Mexico confounds the long established paradigm that the age of dinosaurs ended between 65.5 and 66 million years ago.

The U of A team, led by Larry Heaman from the Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, determined the femur bone of a hadrosaur as being only 64.8 million years old. That means this particular plant eater...

1000pa (Jan. 28, 2011) — University of Alberta...

No leftovers for Tyrannosaurus rex: New evidence that T. rex was hunter, not scavenger

1000pa (Jan. 26, 2011) — Tyrannosaurus rex hunted like a lion, rather than regularly scavenging like a hyena, reveals new research published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B.

The findings end a long-running debate about the hunting behaviour of this awesome predator.

Scientists from the Zoological Society of London (ZSL) used an ecological model based on predator relationships in the Serengeti to determine whether scavenging...

1000pa (Jan. 26, 2011) — Tyrannosaurus rex...

First single-fingered dinosaur discovered

1000pa (Jan. 25, 2011) — A new species of parrot-sized dinosaur, the first discovered with only one finger, has been unearthed in Inner Mongolia, China.

Scientists named the new dinosaur Linhenykus monodactylus, after the nearby city of Linhe. The work was recently published online in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).

The new dinosaur belongs to the Alvarezsauroidea, a branch of the carnivorous dinosaur group Theropoda....

1000pa (Jan. 25, 2011) — A new species of...

New predator 'dawn runner' discovered in early dinosaur graveyard

1000pa (Jan. 13, 2011) — A team of paleontologists and geologists from Argentina and the United States on Jan. 13 announced the discovery of a lanky dinosaur that roamed South America in search of prey as the age of dinosaurs began, approximately 230 million years ago.

Sporting a long neck and tail and weighing only 10 to 15 pounds, the new dinosaur has been named Eodromaeus, the "dawn runner."

"It really is the earliest look we have at the...

1000pa (Jan. 13, 2011) — A team of...

Pterygotid sea scorpions: No terror of the ancient seas?

1000pa (Dec. 24, 2010) — Experiments by a team of researchers in New York and New Jersey have generated evidence that questions the common belief that the pterygotid eurypterids ("sea scorpions") were high-level predators in the Paleozoic oceans. This group, which ranged the seas from about 470 to 370 million years ago (long before the dinosaurs appeared), included the largest and, arguably, scariest-looking arthropods known to have...

1000pa (Dec. 24, 2010) — Experiments by a team of...

T. rex's big tail was its key to speed and hunting prowess

1000pa (Nov. 16, 2010) — Tyrannosaurus rex was far from a plodding Cretaceous era scavenger whose long tail only served to counterbalance the up-front weight of its freakishly big head.

T. rex's athleticism (and its rear end) has been given a makeover by University of Alberta graduate student Scott Persons. His extensive research shows that powerful tail muscles made the giant carnivore one of the fastest moving hunters of its time.

As...

1000pa (Nov. 16, 2010) — Tyrannosaurus rex was...

What did Tyrannosaurus rex eat? Each other

1000pa (Oct. 15, 2010) — It turns out that the undisputed king of the dinosaurs, Tyrannosaurus rex, didn't just eat other dinosaurs but also each other. Paleontologists from the United States and Canada have found bite marks on the giants' bones that were made by other T. rex, according to a new study published online Oct. 15 in the journal PLoS ONE.

While searching through dinosaur fossil collections for another study on dinosaur bones...

1000pa (Oct. 15, 2010) — It turns out that the...

Using discards, scientists discover different dinosaurs' stomping grounds

1000pa (Oct. 15, 2010) — By examining the type of rock in which dinosaur fossils were embedded, an often unappreciated part of the remains, scientists have determined that different species of North American dinosaurs from the Late Cretaceous period 65 million years ago occupied different environments separated by just a few miles.

Hadrosaurs or duck-billed dinosaurs, along with the small ornithopod Thescelosaurus, preferred to live along...

1000pa (Oct. 15, 2010) — By examining the type...

Dinosaurs significantly taller than previously thought, research suggests

1000pa (Oct. 1, 2010) — It might seem obvious that a dinosaur's leg bone connects to the hip bone, but what came between the bones has been less obvious. Now, researchers at the University of Missouri and Ohio University have found that dinosaurs had thick layers of cartilage in their joints, which means they may have been considerably taller than previously thought. The study is being published this week in the journal PLoS ONE (Public...

1000pa (Oct. 1, 2010) — It might seem obvious that...

Amazing horned dinosaurs unearthed on 'lost continent'; New discoveries include bizarre beast with 15 horns

1000pa (Sep. 22, 2010) — Two remarkable new species of horned dinosaurs have been found in Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, southern Utah. The giant plant-eaters were inhabitants of the "lost continent" of Laramidia, formed when a shallow sea flooded the central region of North America, isolating the eastern and western portions of the continent for millions of years during the Late Cretaceous Period.

The newly discovered...

1000pa (Sep. 22, 2010) — Two remarkable new species...

Tyrannosaurus redux: T. rex was more than just a large carnivore at top of food chain, new findings reveal

1000pa (Sep. 17, 2010) — We've all heard this story: the Late Cretaceous of Asia and North America -- about 65 million years ago -- was dominated by several large-headed, bipedal predatory dinosaurs like Tyrannosaurus rex and Tarbosaurus that had tiny arms. But a decade of new fossil discoveries that have more than doubled the number of known tyrannosaur species has changed this tale. Older and smaller tyrannosaurs have made the...

1000pa (Sep. 17, 2010) — We've all heard this story: the...

'Stocky dragon' dinosaur, relative of Velociraptor, terrorized Late Cretaceous Europe

1000pa (Aug. 30, 2010) — By describing a new double-clawed and highly-unusual relative of Velociraptor, paleontologists have answered a long-standing question: what did the Late Cretaceous predatory dinosaurs in Europe look like? Balaur bondoc, described in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, is the first reasonably complete skeleton of a meat-eating dinosaur from the final 60 million years of the Age of Dinosaurs in Europe...

1000pa (Aug. 30, 2010) — By describing a new...

What the locals ate 10,000 years ago

1000pa (Aug. 23, 2010) — If you had a dinner invitation in Utah's Escalante Valley almost 10,000 years ago, you would have come just in time to try a new menu item: mush cooked from the flour of milled sage brush seeds.

After five summers of meticulous excavation, Brigham Young University archaeologists are beginning to publish what they've learned from the "North Creek Shelter." It's the oldest known site occupied by humans in the southern...

1000pa (Aug. 23, 2010) — If you had a dinner...

First horned dinosaur from Mexico: Plant-eater had largest horns of any dinosaur

1000pa (May 29, 2010) — A new species of horned dinosaur unearthed in Mexico has larger horns that any other species -- up to 4 feet long -- and has given scientists fresh insights into the ancient history of western North America, according to a research team led by paleontologists from the Utah Museum of Natural History at the University of Utah.

"We know very little about the dinosaurs of Mexico, and this find increases immeasurably our...

1000pa (May 29, 2010) — A new species of...

New horned dinosaur: Two-ton plant-eater lived 78 million years ago in Montana

1000pa (May 30, 2010) — Michael J. Ryan, Ph.D., a scientist at The Cleveland Museum of Natural History, has announced the discovery of a new horned dinosaur, Medusaceratops lokii. Approximately 20 feet long and weighing more than 2 tons, the newly identified plant-eating dinosaur lived nearly 78 million years ago during the Late Cretaceous period in what is now Montana. Its identification marks the discovery of a new genus of horned...

1000pa (May 30, 2010) — Michael J. Ryan, Ph.D., a...

Were dinosaurs warm- or cold-blooded? First method for directly measuring body temperatures of extinct vertebrates

1000pa (May 25, 2010) — Was Tyrannosaurus rex cold-blooded? Did birds regulate their body temperatures before or after they began to grow feathers? Why would evolution favor warm-bloodedness when it has such a high energy cost?

Questions like these -- about when, why, and how vertebrates stopped relying on external factors to regulate their body temperatures and began heating themselves internally -- have long intrigued scientists.

Now, a...

1000pa (May 25, 2010) — Was Tyrannosaurus rex...

First ever southern tyrannosaur dinosaur discovered

1000pa (Mar. 26, 2010) — Scientists from Cambridge, London and Melbourne have found the first ever evidence that tyrannosaur dinosaurs existed in the southern continents. They identified a hip bone found at Dinosaur Cove in Victoria, Australia as belonging to an ancestor of Tyrannosaurus rex.

The find sheds new light on the evolutionary history of this group of dinosaurs. It also raises the crucial question of why it was only in the north...

1000pa (Mar. 26, 2010) — Scientists from...

How dinosaurs rose to prominence

1000pa (Mar. 23, 2010) — A shade more than 200 million years ago, the Earth looked far different than it does today. Most land on the planet was consolidated into one continent called Pangea. There was no Atlantic Ocean, and the rulers of the animal world were crurotarsans -- creatures closely related to modern crocodiles.

Yet the Earth stood on the cusp of an epic shift in climate, and the reign of the dinosaurs was about to begin. Now, an...

1000pa (Mar. 23, 2010) — A shade more than...

Fossilized feces research produces new evidence related to giant crocodile

1000pa (Mar. 22, 2010) — Ancient bite marks and fossilized feces discovered in Georgia are providing new details about a giant crocodile that roamed the Southeast United States about 79 million years ago.

The giant reptile, called Deinosuchus, was up to 29 feet long and preferred living in a shallow water environment and could take down dinosaurs its own size, as new findings show.

"We're sure (Deinosuchus) ate a lot of sea turtles, but it's...

1000pa (Mar. 22, 2010) — Ancient bite marks...

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Book review

Dinosaurs Encyclopedia

Book Review

Dinosaurs: The Most Complete, Up-to-Date Encyclopedia for Dinosaur Lovers of All Ages ... WRITTEN BY A PROFESSIONAL paleontologist specifically for young readers, this guide to the Dinosauria is packed...