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Lost Treasures

The World's Top Ten Lost Treasures

There are many accounts of lost treasures, some dating from ancient times and those that are more recent.  While the idea that unimaginable wealth is out there somewhere just waiting to be found is a seductive and enticing idea, the truth is that many of these fortunes are either just myths or have probably been 'recycled' long ago. For example, most of the German gold that went missing at the end of WWII was probably smuggled to South America and slowly reintroduced to the market or is still locked in the vaults of private banks impossible to claim.  The missing gold reserves of the last Tsars of Russia probably found its way into the hands of new governments and the treasure of the Titanic probably never existed in the first...

Reconstructing the site of Richard III’s last 'resting place' before Bosworth

The reconstructed physical model of the Blue Board Inn, produced on the University of Leicester’s 3D printer. (Credit: University of Leicester)

A team from the University of Leicester has reconstructed models of the Blue Boar Inn -- reputed to have housed King Richard III before the battle of Bosworth -- following the discovery of a notebook in a private collection containing a measured survey of the iconic local timber framed building.

The survey was made shortly before the inn...

Scientists improve dating of early human settlement

A Simon Fraser University archaeologist and his colleagues at the University of Queensland in Australia have significantly narrowed down the time frame during which the last major chapter in human colonization, the Polynesian triangle, occurred.

SFU professor David Burley, Marshall Weisler and Jian-Xin Zhao argue the first boats arrived between 880 and 896 BC. The 16-year window is far smaller than the previous radiocarbon-dated estimate of 178 years between 2,789 and 2,947 years...

La Bastida unearths 4,200-year-old fortification, unique in continental Europe

 The archaeological excavations carried out this year at the site of La Bastida (Totana, Murcia) have shed light on an imposing fortification system, unique for its time. The discovery, together with all other discoveries made in recent years, reaffirm that the city was the most advanced settlement in Europe in political and military terms during the Bronze Age (ca. 4,200 years ago -- 2,200 BCE), and is comparable only to the Minoan civilisation of Crete.

 

The discovery...

Hidden graves of the Holocaust

An article in the most recent issue of Journal of Conflict Archaeology' by forensic archaeologist Caroline Sturdy Colls explores the pioneering changes made to the archaeological methodology and techniques used to uncover surviving archaeological remains and landscapes of the Holocaust.   The article discusses a number of case studies, including one conducted by the author on Treblinka extermination camp in Poland which operated between 23 July 1942 and 17 November 1943. During...

Archaeologists complete survey of Charleston Harbor Civil War Naval Battlefield

— What remains of a five-year siege for control of Charleston Harbor during the Civil War now lay in watery graves amid the harbor's channels and under the beaches of bordering sea islands.

Thanks to a team of archaeologists at the University of South Carolina, the Charleston Harbor naval battlefield has been mapped for the first time, providing historical and archaeological detail on the drawn-out struggle that spanned 1861-1865. The survey shows where military actions took place...

Test flight over Peru ruins could revolutionize archaeological mapping

Archaeological sites that currently take years to map will be completed in minutes if tests underway in Peru of a new system being developed at Vanderbilt University go well.

The Aurora Flight Sciences unmanned aerial vehicle will be integrated into a larger system that combines the flying device that can fit into a backpack with a software system that can discern an optimal flight pattern and transform the resulting data into three-dimensional maps. The project is an interdisciplinary...

Creative individuals travelled to the south Swedish inland 9,000 years ago

1000pa (June 25, 2012) — Despite its good ecologic status, there were no permanent settlements in the south Swedish inland 9,000 years ago. Yet the area was visited by people who wanted to express their individuality and creativity and thereby gain status. This is found in a new doctoral thesis from the University of Gothenburg.

Carl Persson's doctoral thesis in Archaeology is based on archaeological material discovered in connection with the construction of the E4 highway by...

Legendary lost city of Ciudad Blanca may have been found with airborne LiDAR

1000pa (June 6, 2012) — A field team from the University of Houston and the National Science Foundation (NSF) National Center for Airborne Laser Mapping (NCALM) has mapped a remote region of Honduras that may contain the legendary lost city of Ciudad Blanca.

The results, recently announced by Honduras President Porfirio Lobo, mark the successful completion of the first light detection and ranging (LiDAR) survey of that country's Mosquitia region, one of the world's...

Maya collapse: Trade patterns for crucial substance played key role

1000pa (May 23, 2012) — Shifts in exchange patterns provide a new perspective on the fall of inland Maya centers in Mesoamerica approximately 1,000 years ago. This major historical process, sometimes referred to as the "Maya collapse" has puzzled archaeologists, history buffs, and the news media for decades.

The new research was published online May 23 in the journal Antiquity.

"Our research strongly suggests that changing patterns of trade were instrumental in prompting...

Sulphur and iron compounds common in old shipwrecks

1000pa (May 15, 2012) — Sulphur and iron compounds have now been found in shipwrecks both in the Baltic and off the west coast of Sweden. The group behind the results, presented in the Journal of Archaeological Science, includes scientists from the University of Gothenburg and Stockholm University.

A few years ago scientists reported large quantities of sulphur and iron compounds in the salvaged 17th century warship Vasa, resulting in the development of sulphuric acid and acidic...

Archaeologists unearth slave burial ground on the island of St. Helena

1000pa (Mar. 8, 2012) — Archaeologists from the University of Bristol have unearthed a unique slave burial ground on the remote South Atlantic island of St Helena. The excavation, which took place in advance of construction of a new airport on the island, has revealed dramatic insights into the victims of the Atlantic slave trade during the notorious Middle Passage.

The tiny island of St Helena, 1,000 miles off the coast of south-west Africa, acted as the landing place for many...

Archaeologists find new evidence of animals being introduced to prehistoric Caribbean

1000pa (Dec. 1, 2011) — An archaeological research team from North Carolina State University, the University of Washington and University of Florida has found one of the most diverse collections of prehistoric non-native animal remains in the Caribbean, on the tiny island of Carriacou. The find contributes to our understanding of culture in the region before the arrival of Columbus, and suggests Carriacou may have been more important than...

1000pa (Dec. 1, 2011) — An archaeological...

Scientists race against time to save the last ‘Flying Pencil’, WWII bomber

1000pa (Nov. 3, 2011) — Scientists are in a race against time to help save the last remaining intact World War II German light bomber Dornier Do-17, known as The Flying Pencil (Fliegender Bleistift), which lies underwater in the English Channel off the Kentish coast in the UK.

The researchers, from Imperial College London, are donating their time and scientific expertise to help the Royal Air Force Museum rescue the submerged aircraft,...

1000pa (Nov. 3, 2011) — Scientists are in a race...

Ancient cooking pots reveal gradual transition to agriculture

1000pa (Oct. 24, 2011) — Humans may have undergone a gradual rather than an abrupt transition from fishing, hunting and gathering to farming, according to a new study of ancient pottery.

Researchers at the University of York and the University of Bradford analysed cooking residues preserved in 133 ceramic vessels from the Western Baltic regions of Northern Europe to establish whether these residues were from terrestrial, marine or...

1000pa (Oct. 24, 2011) — Humans may have undergone a...

Hundreds of undiscovered artifacts found at Gallipoli battlefield

1000pa (Oct. 5, 2011) — More than 100 artefacts from the First World War have been uncovered in an archaeological fieldwork survey on the Gallipoli battlefield, leading to some interesting theories about life on the frontline according to University of Melbourne survey archaeologist Professor Antonio Sagona.

The discoveries were made as part of a second season of fieldwork undertaken as part of the Joint Historical and Archaeological Survey...

1000pa (Oct. 5, 2011) — More than 100...

Tree resin captures evolution of feathers on dinosaurs and birds

1000pa (Sep. 15, 2011) — Secrets from the age of the dinosaurs are usually revealed by fossilized bones, but a University of Alberta research team has turned up a treasure trove of Cretaceous feathers trapped in tree resin. The resin turned to resilient amber, preserving some 80 million-year-old protofeathers, possibly from non-avian dinosaurs, as well as plumage that is very similar to modern birds, including those that can swim under...

1000pa (Sep. 15, 2011) — Secrets from the age of...

Nobel Prize winner’s unfinished symphony

1000pa (Aug. 1, 2011) — When Robert Burns Woodward passed away in 1979 he left 699 pages of handwritten notes. Because R.B. Woodward was a Nobel Laureate (Chemistry, 1965) his family had carefully preserved his notes for posterity. A paper published in Elsevier's Tetrahedron summarizes the process of an extensive study uncovering the hidden treasures in these notes.

The notes were meticulously drawn sketches outlining Woodward's ideas on...

1000pa (Aug. 1, 2011) — When Robert Burns...

Technology to throw new light on ancient artifacts

1000pa (July 20, 2011) — New technology which makes it possible to study the finer details of some of the world's greatest historical artifacts has been developed by computer scientists and archaeologists at the University of Southampton in conjunction with academics at the University of Oxford.

Dr Kirk Martinez at the University of Southampton's ECS -- Electronics and Computer Science and the team have developed two Reflectance...

1000pa (July 20, 2011) — New technology which makes it...

How prehistoric Native Americans of Cahokia made copper artifacts

1000pa (June 13, 2011) — Northwestern University researchers ditched many of their high-tech tools and turned to large stones, fire and some old-fashioned elbow grease to recreate techniques used by Native American coppersmiths who lived more than 600 years ago.

This prehistoric approach to metalworking was part of a metallurgical analysis of copper artifacts left behind by the Mississippians of the Cahokia Mounds, who lived in southeastern Illinois from 700 until 1400 A.D. The...

California's Chumash Indians: Roughly hewn beads are child's play, archaeologist finds

1000pa (May 11, 2011) — As the world's leading authority on beads manufactured from shells by California's Chumash Indians, UCLA archaeologist Jeanne Arnold was stumped by a series of anomalous artifacts excavated at former settlements on the Channel Islands.

Pierced with more than one hole, often at unconventional angles or too close to the edges, the oddly configured multi-hole beads differ considerably from the smooth, round, precisely...

1000pa (May 11, 2011) — As the world's leading...

First Bird

First Bird
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Unexplained artifacts

unexplained artifacts
The 10 most amazing unexplained artifacts

Evolution

Timeline: Human Evolution

Biggest Dinosaurs

The 10 Biggest Dinosaurs

Fossils 

Fossil Formation: How Do Fossils Form?
 

Book review

Dinosaurs Encyclopedia

Book Review

Dinosaurs: The Most Complete, Up-to-Date Encyclopedia for Dinosaur Lovers of All Ages ... WRITTEN BY A PROFESSIONAL paleontologist specifically for young readers, this guide to the Dinosauria is packed...